Category: Book of Isaiah


“Was the Book of Isaiah written by multiple Isaiah’s?”

Most Bible scholars are in agreement that Isaiah was the sole author of the book that bears his name. However, there are those “liberal” scholars who are skeptical about anything that points to supernatural inspiration of the Bible. In fact, they go so far as to explain the fulfilled prophecies in these books by re-dating them to after the events occurred! The theory of multiple Isaiahs is just another example of skepticism from those who want to call into question the Bible as God’s inspired Word.

This theory of “Deutero-Isaiah” (or second Isaiah) came about near the end of the eighteenth century. Supposedly, Isaiah himself wrote only the first 39 chapters, leaving one of his students to write the second part (chapters 40—66). This was done allegedly sometime after the Babylonian captivity started (after 586 BC). As such, this later date would explain explicit predictions of “Cyrus, King of Persia” in Isaiah 44:28—45:1.

The “Deutero-Isaiah” theory claims Isaiah chapters 40—55 contain no personal details of the prophet Isaiah as compared to Isaiah 1—39. The first section tells of numerous stories of Isaiah, especially his dealings with kings and others in Jerusalem. The theory goes on to say that the style and language of Isaiah 40—55 seem to be quite different from the earlier chapters. What is so interesting about this argument is that it is also promulgated by the authors who support one author for the book! One contention is that specific references to Cyrus began with the experiences of the exiles in Babylon. This last argument is supposedly the strongest. It claims the second part of the second part of Isaiah was written later because only a later date can explain the accuracy of the prophecy.

Again, most reputable Bible scholars reject the “Deutero-Isaiah” theory. Their conclusions include the similarity of writing styles in both sections, the consistent use of the same words throughout, and the familiarity of the author with Palestine, but not Babylon. Furthermore, Jewish tradition uniformly ascribes the entire book to Isaiah.

The Dead Sea Scrolls contain a complete scroll of Isaiah dated from the second century BC. The book is one unit with the end of chapter 39 and the beginning of chapter 40 in one continuous column of text. This demonstrates that the scribes who copied this scroll never doubted the singular unity of the book. Neither did the New Testament authors, nor the early church, as quotations from both sections are attributed only to Isaiah.

The book of Isaiah contains extensive and precise prophecies about the coming of the Messiah as well as the life and crucifixion of Christ. Briefly these include:

• The reign of Christ in the kingdom (Isaiah 2:3–5)
• The virgin birth of Christ (Isaiah 7:14)
• The reign of Christ (Isaiah 9:2, 7)
• Jesus’ rule over the world (Isaiah 9:4)
• Christ as a descendant of David (Isaiah 11:1, 10)
• Christ to be filled with the Spirit (Isaiah 11:2; 42:1)
• Christ to judge with righteousness (Isaiah 11:3–5; 42:1, 4)
• Christ to rule over the nations (Isaiah 11:10)
• Christ to be gentle to the weak (Isaiah 42:3)
• Christ to make possible the New Covenant (Isaiah 42:6; 49:8)
• Christ to be a light to the Gentiles and to be worshiped by them (Isaiah 42:6; 49:6–7; 52:15)
• Christ to be rejected by Israel (Isaiah 49:7; 53:1–3)
• Christ to be obedient to God and subject to suffering (Isaiah 50:6; 53:7–8)
• Christ to be exalted (Isaiah 52:13; 53:12)
• Christ to restore Israel and judge the wicked (61:1-3).

Messianic prophecy is strong and important evidence for Jesus’ claims to be God. Isaiah’s writings were completed many centuries before Jesus Christ was born and yet are completely accurate. Remember, the Dead Sea Scrolls contained more than one complete scroll of this book composed well before the birth of Christ. And the book of Isaiah was included in the Septuagint (LXX), the earliest version of the Old Testament Scriptures, translated at least 300 years earlier.

But by far the strongest evidence that proves the unity of the book of Isaiah is that Jesus Himself quoted from both the beginning and the end of the book, attributing all of it to Isaiah.

1. Jesus quoting from Isaiah 29:13: “Isaiah was right when he prophesied about you hypocrites; as it is written: ‘These people honor me with their lips, but their hearts are far from me. They worship me in vain; their teachings are but rules taught by men’” (Mark 7:6–7).

2. Jesus also referenced Isaiah 42:1–4 in Matthew 12:17: “This was to fulfill what was spoken through the prophet Isaiah.”

3. Isaiah is also referenced in Matthew 8:16–17 by quoting Isaiah 53:4: “This was to fulfill what was spoken through the prophet Isaiah: ‘He took up our infirmities and carried our diseases.’”

Aside from the passages quoted by Jesus above, several other New Testament verses refer to the prophet Isaiah as been the sole author: Matthew 3:3 and Luke 3:4 (Isaiah 40:3); Romans 10:16, 20 (Isaiah 53:1; 65:1); John 12:38-41 (Isaiah 53:1; 6:10). But the fact that our Lord Jesus affirmed Isaiah’s authorship by quoting from both sections of the book and attributing them to Isaiah is proof enough of the entire book’s authorship. Those who reject the words of the Lord Himself will never be convinced by any other means.

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Perhaps the greatest of all Messianic prophecies in the Tanakh (the Hebrew Scriptures / the Old Testament) concerning the advent of the Jewish Messiah is found in the 53rd chapter of the prophet Isaiah. This section of the Prophets, also known as the “Suffering Servant,” has been long understood by the historical Rabbis of Judaism to speak of the Redeemer who will one day come to Zion. Here is a sampling of what Judaism has traditionally believed about the identity of the “Suffering Servant” of Isaiah 53:

The Babylonian Talmud says: “The Messiah, what is his name? The Rabbis say, The Leper Scholar, as it is said, ‘surely he has borne our griefs and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem him a leper, smitten of God and afflicted…'” (Sanhedrin 98b).

Midrash Ruth Rabbah says: “Another explanation (of Ruth 2:14): He is speaking of king Messiah; ‘Come hither,’ draw near to the throne; ‘and eat of the bread,’ that is, the bread of the kingdom; ‘and dip thy morsel in the vinegar,’ this refers to his chastisements, as it is said, `But he was wounded for our transgressions, bruised for our iniquities.'”

The Targum Jonathan says: “Behold my servant Messiah shall prosper; he shall be high and increase and be exceedingly strong.”

The Zohar says: “’He was wounded for our transgressions,’ etc….There is in the Garden of Eden a palace called the Palace of the Sons of Sickness; this palace the Messiah then enters, and summons every sickness, every pain, and every chastisement of Israel; they all come and rest upon him. And were it not that he had thus lightened them off Israel and taken them upon himself, there had been no man able to bear Israel’s chastisements for the transgression of the law: and this is that which is written, `Surely our sicknesses he hath carried.'”

The great (Rambam) Rabbi Moses Maimonides says: “What is the manner of Messiah’s advent….there shall rise up one of whom none have known before, and signs and wonders which they shall see performed by him will be the proofs of his true origin; for the Almighty, where he declares to us his mind upon this matter, says, `Behold a man whose name is the Branch, and he shall branch forth out of his place’ (Zechariah 6:12). And Isaiah speaks similarly of the time when he shall appear, without father or mother or family being known, He came up as a sucker before him, and as a root out of dry earth, etc….in the words of Isaiah, when describing the manner in which kings will harken to him, At him kings will shut their mouth; for that which had not been told them have they seen, and that which they had not heard they have perceived.”

Unfortunately, modern Rabbis of Judaism believe that the “Suffering Servant” of Isaiah 53 refers perhaps to Israel, or to Isaiah himself, or even Moses or another of the Jewish prophets. But Isaiah is clear – he speaks of the Messiah, as many ancient rabbis concluded.

The second verse of Isaiah 53 confirms this clarity. The figure grows up as “a young plant, and like a root out of dry ground.” The shoot springing up is beyond reasonable doubt a reference to the Messiah, and, in fact, it is a common Messianic reference in Isaiah and elsewhere. The Davidic dynasty was to be cut down in judgment like a felled tree, but it was promised to Israel that a new sprout would shoot up from the stump. King Messiah was to be that sprout.

Beyond doubt, the “Suffering Servant” of Isaiah 53 refers to Messiah. He is the one highly exalted before whom kings shut their mouths. Messiah is the shoot who sprung up from the fallen Davidic dynasty. He became the King of Kings. He provided the ultimate atonement.

Isaiah 53 must be understood as referring to the coming Davidic King, the Messiah. King Messiah was prophesied to suffer and die to pay for our sins and then rise again. He would serve as a priest to the nations of the world and apply the blood of atonement to cleanse those who believe. There is One alone to whom this can refer, Jesus Christ!

Those who confess him are his children, his promised offspring, and the spoils of his victory. According to the testimony of the Jewish Apostles, Jesus died for our sins, rose again, ascended to the right hand of God, and he now serves as our great High Priest who cleanses us of sin (Hebrew 2:17; 8:1). Jesus, the Jewish Messiah, is the one Isaiah foresaw.

Rabbi Moshe Kohen Ibn Crispin said, “This rabbi described those who interpret Isaiah 53 as referring to Israel as those “having forsaken the knowledge of our Teachers, and inclined after the `stubbornness of their own hearts,’ and of their own opinion, I am pleased to interpret it, in accordance with the teaching of our Rabbis, of the King Messiah. This prophecy was delivered by Isaiah at the divine command for the purpose of making known to us something about the nature of the future Messiah, who is to come and deliver Israel, and his life from the day when he arrives at discretion until his advent as a redeemer, in order that if anyone should arise claiming to be himself the Messiah, we may reflect, and look to see whether we can observe in him any resemblance to the traits described here; if there is any such resemblance, then we may believe that he is the Messiah our righteousness; but if not, we cannot do so.”

Isaiah 40:28-31

After I’d witnessed an eagle in flight, I understood why God used this bird to describe a relationship with Him. The eagle—which simply opens its wings and soars—is wholly dependent upon air currents to keep it aloft.

In contrast, we often beat our wings trying to be better Christians. We resolve to read the Bible more or to improve at keeping our temper. We strive to escape old habits and temptations. But instead of flying to the mountaintops, we remain on the valley floor with tired wings. This is because believers sometimes get confused about what a spiritually mature person looks like. The godly believer isn’t someone who tries and tries to do well. I’ve been a believer long enough to know that I can’t live the Christian life. This flesh of mine isn’t a bit better today than it was the day I was saved.

Spiritual maturity means recognizing that we do not change ourselves. Flesh is corrupt, and its vices cannot be suppressed by any human means. But our omnipotent Father subdues believers’ human impulses through His Spirit. For example, God’s  indwelling Spirit calms anger and wields His strength to weaken the lure of old temptations. While others tire from trying to be good, the mature believer relies upon God and will “mount up with wings like eagles” (Is. 40:31).

Isaiah reminds us that even young men stumble and grow weak. Anyone trying to change himself into a model Christian will burn out beating his wings against the world system and his own flesh. God didn’t make these human bodies, minds, or spirits to fly solo. He created us to soar on His strength.

Author: Isaiah 1:1 identifies the author of the Book of Isaiah as the Prophet  Isaiah.

Date of Writing: The Book of Isaiah was written  between 701 and 681 B.C.

Purpose of Writing: The Prophet  Isaiah was primarily called to prophesy to the Kingdom of Judah. Judah was going  through times of revival and times of rebellion. Judah was threatened with  destruction by Assyria and Egypt, but was spared because of God’s mercy. Isaiah  proclaimed a message of repentance from sin and hopeful expectation of God’s  deliverance in the future.

Key Verses: Isaiah 6:8, “Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying,  ‘Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?’ And I said, ‘Here am I. Send  me!’”

Isaiah 7:14,  “Therefore the Lord himself will give you a sign: The virgin will be with child  and will give birth to a son, and will call him Immanuel.”

Isaiah 9:6, “For to us a child is born, to us a son is  given, and the government will be on his shoulders. And he will be called  Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.”

Isaiah 14:12-13, “How  you have fallen from heaven, O morning star, son of the dawn! You have been cast  down to the earth, you who once laid low the nations! You said in your heart, “I  will ascend to heaven; I will raise my throne above the stars of God; I will sit  enthroned on the mount of assembly, on the utmost heights of the sacred  mountain.”

Isaiah  53:5-6, “But he was pierced for our transgressions, he was crushed for our  iniquities; the punishment that brought us peace was upon him, and by his wounds  we are healed. We all, like sheep, have gone astray, each of us has turned to  his own way; and the LORD has laid on him the iniquity of us all.”

Isaiah 65:25, “The wolf and  the lamb will feed together, and the lion will eat straw like the ox, but dust  will be the serpent’s food. They will neither harm nor destroy on all my holy  mountain, says the LORD.”

Brief Summary: The Book of  Isaiah reveals God’s judgment and salvation. God is “holy, holy, holy” (Isaiah 6:3), and therefore He  cannot allow sin to go unpunished (Isaiah 1:22:11-205:30; 34:1-2; 42:25). Isaiah portrays  God’s oncoming judgment as a “consuming fire” (Isaiah 1:3130:33).

At the same  time, Isaiah understands that God is a God of mercy, grace, and compassion (Isaiah 5:25; 11:16; 14:1-2; 32:2; 40:3; 41:14-16). The nation of  Israel (both Judah and Israel) is blind and deaf to God’s commands (Isaiah 6:9-10; 42:7). Judah is compared to a vineyard that should be,  and will be, trampled on (Isaiah  5:1-7). Only because of His mercy and His promises to Israel, will God not  allow Israel or Judah to be completely destroyed. He will bring restoration,  forgiveness, and healing (43:2; 43:16-19; 52:10-12).

More than any other  book in the Old Testament, Isaiah focuses on the salvation that will come  through the Messiah. The Messiah will one day rule in justice and righteousness  (Isaiah 9:7; 32:1). The reign of the Messiah will bring peace and  safety to Israel (Isaiah  11:6-9). Through the Messiah, Israel will be a light to all the nations (Isaiah 42:6; 55:4-5). The Messiah’s  kingdom on earth (Isaiah chapter 65-66) is the goal towards which all of the  Book of Isaiah points. It is during the reign of the Messiah that God’s  righteousness will be fully revealed to the world.

In a seeming paradox,  the Book of Isaiah also presents the Messiah as one who will suffer. Isaiah  chapter 53 vividly describes the Messiah suffering for sin. It is through His  wounds that healing is achieved. It is through His suffering that our iniquities  are taken away. This apparent contradiction is solved in the Person of Jesus  Christ. In His first advent, Jesus was the suffering servant of Isaiah chapter  53. In His second advent, Jesus will be the conquering and ruling King, the  Prince of Peace (Isaiah  9:6).

Foreshadowings: As stated above, chapter 53  of Isaiah describes the coming Messiah and the suffering He would endure in  order to pay for our sins. In His sovereignty, God orchestrated every detail of  the crucifixion to fulfill every prophecy of this chapter, as well as all other  messianic prophecies of the Old Testament. The imagery of chapter 53 is poignant  and prophetic and contains a complete picture of the Gospel. Jesus was despised  and rejected (v. 3; Luke 13:34John 1:10-11), stricken by  God (v.4; Matthew  27:46), and pierced for our transgressions (v. 5; John 19:34; 1 Peter  2:24). By His suffering, He paid the punishment we deserved and became for  us the ultimate and perfect sacrifice (v. 5; Hebrews  10:10). Although He was sinless, God laid on Him our sin, and we became  God’s righteousness in Him (2  Corinthians 5:21).

Practical Application: The Book  of Isaiah presents our Savior to us in undeniable detail. He is the only way to  heaven, the only means of obtaining the grace of God, the only Way, the only  Truth, and the only Life (John 14:6; Acts 4:12). Knowing the price  Christ paid for us, how can we neglect or reject “so great a salvation”? (Hebrews 2:3). We have only a  few, short years on earth to come to Christ and embrace the salvation only He  offers. There is no second chance after death, and eternity in hell is a very  long time.

Do you know people who claim to be believers in Christ who  are two-faced, who are hypocrites? That is perhaps the best summary of how  Isaiah viewed the nation of Israel. Israel had an appearance of righteousness,  but it was a facade. In the Book of Isaiah, the Prophet Isaiah challenges Israel  to obey God with all of their heart, not just on the outside. Isaiah’s desire  was that those who heard and read his words would be convicted to turn from  wickedness and turn to God for forgiveness and healing.

Author: Isaiah 1:1 identifies the author of the Book of Isaiah as the Prophet  Isaiah.

Date of Writing: The Book of Isaiah was written  between 701 and 681 B.C.

Purpose of Writing: The Prophet  Isaiah was primarily called to prophesy to the Kingdom of Judah. Judah was going  through times of revival and times of rebellion. Judah was threatened with  destruction by Assyria and Egypt, but was spared because of God’s mercy. Isaiah  proclaimed a message of repentance from sin and hopeful expectation of God’s  deliverance in the future.

Key Verses: Isaiah 6:8, “Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying,  ‘Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?’ And I said, ‘Here am I. Send  me!’”

Isaiah 7:14,  “Therefore the Lord himself will give you a sign: The virgin will be with child  and will give birth to a son, and will call him Immanuel.”

Isaiah 9:6, “For to us a child is born, to us a son is  given, and the government will be on his shoulders. And he will be called  Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.”

Isaiah 14:12-13, “How  you have fallen from heaven, O morning star, son of the dawn! You have been cast  down to the earth, you who once laid low the nations! You said in your heart, “I  will ascend to heaven; I will raise my throne above the stars of God; I will sit  enthroned on the mount of assembly, on the utmost heights of the sacred  mountain.”

Isaiah  53:5-6, “But he was pierced for our transgressions, he was crushed for our  iniquities; the punishment that brought us peace was upon him, and by his wounds  we are healed. We all, like sheep, have gone astray, each of us has turned to  his own way; and the LORD has laid on him the iniquity of us all.”

Isaiah 65:25, “The wolf and  the lamb will feed together, and the lion will eat straw like the ox, but dust  will be the serpent’s food. They will neither harm nor destroy on all my holy  mountain, says the LORD.”

Brief Summary: The Book of  Isaiah reveals God’s judgment and salvation. God is “holy, holy, holy” (Isaiah 6:3), and therefore He  cannot allow sin to go unpunished (Isaiah 1:22:11-205:30; 34:1-2; 42:25). Isaiah portrays  God’s oncoming judgment as a “consuming fire” (Isaiah 1:3130:33).

At the same  time, Isaiah understands that God is a God of mercy, grace, and compassion (Isaiah 5:25; 11:16; 14:1-2; 32:2; 40:3; 41:14-16). The nation of  Israel (both Judah and Israel) is blind and deaf to God’s commands (Isaiah 6:9-10; 42:7). Judah is compared to a vineyard that should be,  and will be, trampled on (Isaiah  5:1-7). Only because of His mercy and His promises to Israel, will God not  allow Israel or Judah to be completely destroyed. He will bring restoration,  forgiveness, and healing (43:2; 43:16-19; 52:10-12).

More than any other  book in the Old Testament, Isaiah focuses on the salvation that will come  through the Messiah. The Messiah will one day rule in justice and righteousness  (Isaiah 9:7; 32:1). The reign of the Messiah will bring peace and  safety to Israel (Isaiah  11:6-9). Through the Messiah, Israel will be a light to all the nations (Isaiah 42:6; 55:4-5). The Messiah’s  kingdom on earth (Isaiah chapter 65-66) is the goal towards which all of the  Book of Isaiah points. It is during the reign of the Messiah that God’s  righteousness will be fully revealed to the world.

In a seeming paradox,  the Book of Isaiah also presents the Messiah as one who will suffer. Isaiah  chapter 53 vividly describes the Messiah suffering for sin. It is through His  wounds that healing is achieved. It is through His suffering that our iniquities  are taken away. This apparent contradiction is solved in the Person of Jesus  Christ. In His first advent, Jesus was the suffering servant of Isaiah chapter  53. In His second advent, Jesus will be the conquering and ruling King, the  Prince of Peace (Isaiah  9:6).

Foreshadowings: As stated above, chapter 53  of Isaiah describes the coming Messiah and the suffering He would endure in  order to pay for our sins. In His sovereignty, God orchestrated every detail of  the crucifixion to fulfill every prophecy of this chapter, as well as all other  messianic prophecies of the Old Testament. The imagery of chapter 53 is poignant  and prophetic and contains a complete picture of the Gospel. Jesus was despised  and rejected (v. 3; Luke 13:34John 1:10-11), stricken by  God (v.4; Matthew  27:46), and pierced for our transgressions (v. 5; John 19:34; 1 Peter  2:24). By His suffering, He paid the punishment we deserved and became for  us the ultimate and perfect sacrifice (v. 5; Hebrews  10:10). Although He was sinless, God laid on Him our sin, and we became  God’s righteousness in Him (2  Corinthians 5:21).

Practical Application: The Book  of Isaiah presents our Savior to us in undeniable detail. He is the only way to  heaven, the only means of obtaining the grace of God, the only Way, the only  Truth, and the only Life (John 14:6; Acts 4:12). Knowing the price  Christ paid for us, how can we neglect or reject “so great a salvation”? (Hebrews 2:3). We have only a  few, short years on earth to come to Christ and embrace the salvation only He  offers. There is no second chance after death, and eternity in hell is a very  long time.

Do you know people who claim to be believers in Christ who  are two-faced, who are hypocrites? That is perhaps the best summary of how  Isaiah viewed the nation of Israel. Israel had an appearance of righteousness,  but it was a facade. In the Book of Isaiah, the Prophet Isaiah challenges Israel  to obey God with all of their heart, not just on the outside. Isaiah’s desire  was that those who heard and read his words would be convicted to turn from  wickedness and turn to God for forgiveness and healing.

“What should we learn”

Isaiah, whose name means “Yahweh is salvation,” is best known for  writing the book that bears his name in the Old Testament. His writings are  especially significant for the prophecies he made about the coming Messiah,  hundreds of years before Jesus was born (Isaiah 7:149:1-7, 11:2-4; 53:4-7, 9, 12).  Matthew quotes Isaiah when describing John the Baptist’s ministry (Matthew 3:3; Isaiah  40:3), and when Jesus moved to Galilee to start His ministry, Isaiah’s  prophecy was fulfilled (Matthew  4:13-16; Isaiah  9:1-2). Jesus quotes Isaiah’s prophecy when speaking in parables (Isaiah 6:9; Matthew  13:14-15), and the apostle Paul also makes reference to the same prophecy  when he is in Rome (Acts  28:26-27). When Jesus reads from Isaiah (Isaiah  61:1-2) in the synagogue at Nazareth, He amazes many of the Jews by claiming  the prophecy is fulfilled in Him (Luke  4:16-21). It is also interesting to note that the Gospels quote more from  Isaiah’s writings than from any other of the Old Testament prophets.

Little is written about Isaiah the man. We know that he was the son of Amoz and  that he married and had sons of his own (Isaiah 1:17:3; 8:3). Though Isaiah’s recognition as a great prophet is  indicated in the books of the Kings and Chronicles, it is also probable that he  was a priest, as his calling from God took place in the temple (Isaiah 6:4), an area reserved only for priests. The  anointing he receives at his calling is similar to that of the prophet Jeremiah  (Jeremiah  1:9; Isaiah 6:7).

Along with his contemporary, the prophet Micah, Isaiah served the  southern kingdom of Judah under the reigns of four kings. At the time of  Isaiah’s ministry, Judah was a sinful and unjust nation. Nevertheless, Isaiah  believed that Judah was God’s chosen nation and they would be vindicated by God.  With support from Micah and the godly King Hezekiah, their enemies were held at  bay and a revival swept through the nation of Judah (2 Kings 19:32-36; 2  Chronicles 32:20-23). Many commentators describe Isaiah as Judah’s  evangelist because he worked tirelessly to turn the people back to God.

There were many highs and lows in Isaiah’s life. His faithfulness to God was  rewarded with some amazing miracles. In answer to Isaiah’s prayer, God moved the  sun back ten steps as a sign to King Hezekiah that God would add a further 15  years to Hezekiah’s life (2 Kings  20:8-11; 2  Chronicles 32:24). Yet Isaiah spent three years stripped naked and barefoot,  in obedience to God, as a “sign and wonder” against the Egyptians (Isaiah 20:2-4). His  contemporary, Micah, did likewise (Micah 1:8),  though it doesn’t say for how long.

It is in examining a man’s heart  that we can learn what kind of a man he is, and Jesus said it is from the  overflow of a man’s heart that he speaks (Matthew  12:34). It is from Isaiah’s writings that we learn of his unswerving  faithfulness and his complete humility before God. He also had great respect  from King Hezekiah’s court and his peers, which was evident in times of crisis.  Some of the world’s greatest art works, music and poetry have come from men who  walked closely with God, and we can count Isaiah among them. His grasp of the  Hebrew language has been likened to that of Shakespeare’s English, as we read in  Isaiah some of the most beautiful writings in the Bible. Though the book of  Isaiah was written over 2,500 years ago, it is well worth reading through the  entire book, because in it we see much wisdom that still applies to our  Christian lives today.

It appears that Isaiah was a very private man.  When we meet some of today’s renowned speakers face to face, we may be  disappointed to find they appear somewhat aloof. However, as with Isaiah, we can  learn that their ministry is all about pointing people to God, not to  themselves. And despite his reticence, Isaiah’s prominence is in the effect his  ministry had on the people. In these last days, we need to make every word we  speak count for the kingdom. And from Isaiah’s lifestyle we learn that, when God  accomplishes a part of His plan through us, we must ensure that all the glory  goes to Him.

In addition, it appears Isaiah’s ministry was  characterized by closeness with other godly men, like Micah and King Hezekiah.  Going it alone can often leave us vulnerable, but when we are united by God’s  Holy Spirit to other members of the body of Christ through fellowship and  prayer, our ministry is more effective by virtue of the protection others  provide.