Category: A thru C


For 235 years, America has been blessed as the longest on-going Constitutional Republic in the history of the world. These blessings are not accidental they are blessings of God. This is evident as we look at the turmoil in other nations and contrast that to the stability we see in America. Preserving American liberty depends first upon our understanding of the foundations on which this great country was built, and then it depends on preserving the principles on which it was founded.

On July 2, 1776, Congress voted to approve a complete separation from England. Two days later, the early draft of the Declaration of Independence was signed. Four days later, members of Congress took the document and read it out loud from the steps of Independence Hall, proclaiming it to the city of Philadelphia, and afterwards they rang the Liberty Bell. The inscription on the top of the bell is Leviticus 25:10, which reads, “Proclaim liberty throughout the land and to all the inhabitants thereof.”

John Adams said, “The general principles on which the Fathers achieved independence were the general principles of Christianity.” Probably the clearest identification of the spirit of the American Revolution was given by John in a letter to Abigail the day after Congress approved the Declaration. He wrote her two letters that day: One was short and jubilant that the Declaration had been approved; the other letter was much longer and gave serious consideration to what had been done that day. Adams could already foresee that their actions would be celebrated by future generations.

A Different Holiday

Adams also noted: “This day will be the most memorable epic in the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival.” He felt the celebration should be in a manner that would commemorate the day as a “day of deliverance by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty.” John Adams believed that the Fourth of July should be a religious holiday. The two top holidays celebrated in this country are Christmas and the Fourth of July. According to John Quincy Adams, the two dates are connected. On the Fourth of July, the Founding Fathers simply took the precepts of Christ and His birth (Christmas) and incorporated those principles into civil government. The Declaration of Independence was the birth certificate for this nation, but the men who signed it knew it could be their death warrant. The closing paragraph states, “And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance of the protection of Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.” The 56 Founding Fathers, 27 of whom were trained as ministers took their pledge seriously. On the morning of the signing, there was silence and gloom as each man was called up to the table of the President of Congress to sign the document, knowing that it could mean their death by hanging. Most wars have a motto. The motto of World War II was “Remember Pearl Harbor.” The motto during the Texas war for independence was “Remember the Alamo.” The spiritual emphasis, directed towards King George III who violated Gods laws, gave rise to a motto during the American Revolution: “No King but King Jesus.” The Founding Fathers passed the torch to us. It is our responsibility to not let it go out.

God Bless America !

 

In summary, what the Bible teaches about the civil rights movement is this: it should never have been necessary. Beginning with the kidnapping and chattel slavery of millions, on through the hateful attitudes that prevented neighbors from using the same drinking fountain, the attitudes and actions that led to a culture where the civil rights movement became necessary were all categorically unbiblical. Christianity and civil rights should go hand in hand. Discrimination based on race or skin color has no place in the Christian worldview.

To begin with, the practice of slavery that introduced millions of Africans to the American South was completely unscriptural and un-Christian. Exodus 21:16 says, “He who kidnaps a man, whether he sells him or he is found in his possession, shall surely be put to death.” Several thousand years later, Paul equated kidnapping with lawlessness and rebellion against God’s order (1 Timothy 1:8-10). The New Testament admonitions for slaves to be submissive to their masters does not justify the actions of traders, slave owners, or the government and society that procured and treated slaves in ways directly contrary to Scripture.

After the slaves in America were emancipated, ungodly attitudes and actions toward them continued. There is nothing scriptural about racial prejudice (Galatians 3:28), unfair business practices (Proverbs 20:10), forced segregation within the Christian body (Galatians 3:29), or murder (Exodus 20:13). But human sin continued to shape an abusive society for a hundred years after the slaves were freed.

The goal of the civil rights movement was good and biblical—ensure fair rights and equal treatment for all. Any martin-luther-king-jraction that worked against this goal, therefore, has to be considered unbiblical. The Bible not only forbids favor for specific people groups, it forbids unfair treatment of anyone (James 2:1-7).

Thanks to the non-violent policies of many of the civil rights leaders, most notably Martin Luther King Jr.,  much of the work toward civil rights was biblical. Free speech is granted to all Americans, and reminding a government and a culture of their constitutional and spiritual responsibilities is good and right. The tremendous effort and patience of civil rights activists to work within local and national legal systems is a great example of positively changing a God-given authority from within. The Freedom Riders, activists who rode buses to challenge states’ segregation laws, were also lawful because the previous year the U.S. Supreme Court had ruled in Boynton v. Virginia that racial segregation on public transportation violated the Interstate Commerce Act. Their endurance through physical attacks and prison is a classic example of 1 Peter 2:20 in action.

At the core of “civil rights” is the God-ordained value of each individual. Every person is made in the image of God. When nations recognize civil rights, they recognize the equality of all mankind. The civil rights movement in twentieth-century America can, for the most part, be considered a good example of encouraging a nation to embody more biblical standards.

The practice of making New Year’s resolutions goes back over 3,000 years to the ancient Babylonians. There is just something about the start of a new year that gives us the feeling of a fresh start and a new beginning. In reality, there is no difference between December 31 and January 1. Nothing mystical occurs at midnight on December 31. The Bible does not speak for or against the concept of New Year’s resolutions. However, if a Christian determines to make a New Year’s resolution, what kind of resolution should he or she make?

Common New Year’s resolutions are commitments to quit smoking, to stop drinking, to manage money more wisely, and to spend more time with family. By far, the most common New Year’s resolution is to lose weight, in conjunction with exercising more and eating more healthily. These are all good goals to set. However, 1 Timothy 4:8 instructs us to keep exercise in perspective: “For physical training is of some value, but godliness has value for all things, holding promise for both the present life and the life to come.” The vast majority of New Year’s resolutions, even among Christians, are in relation to physical things. This should not be.

Many Christians make New Year’s resolutions to pray more, to read the Bible every day, and to attend church more regularly. These are fantastic goals. However, these New Year’s resolutions fail just as often as the non-spiritual resolutions, because there is no power in a New Year’s resolution. Resolving to start or stop doing a certain activity has no value unless you have the proper motivation for stopping or starting that activity. For example, why do you want to read the Bible every day? Is it to honor God and grow spiritually, or is it because you have just heard that it is a good thing to do? Why do you want to lose weight? Is it to honor God with your body, or is it for vanity, to honor yourself?

Philippians 4:13 tells us, “I can do everything through Him who gives me strength.” John 15:5 declares, “I am the vine; you are the branches. If a man remains in me and I in him, he will bear much fruit; apart from me you can do nothing.” If God is the center of your New Year’s resolution, it has chance for success, depending on your commitment to it. If it is God’s will for something to be fulfilled, He will enable you to fulfill it. If a resolution is not God honoring and/or is not in agreement in God’s Word, we will not receive God’s help in fulfilling the resolution.

So, what sort of New Year’s resolution should a Christian make? Here are some suggestions: (1) pray to the Lord for wisdom (James 1:5) in regards to what resolutions, if any, He would have you make; (2) pray for wisdom as to how to fulfill the goals God gives you; (3) rely on God’s strength to help you; (4) find an accountability partner who will help you and encourage you; (5) don’t become discouraged with occasional failures; instead, allow them to motivate you further; (6) don’t become proud or vain, but give God the glory. Psalm 37:5-6 says, “Commit your way to the LORD; trust in him and he will do this: He will make your righteousness shine like the dawn, the justice of your cause like the noonday sun.”

Find out how Christmas Traditions and how Christmas is celebrated in lots of different countries and cultures around the world! Find out how your ancestors celebrate Christmas.

Carols were first sung in Europe thousands of years ago, but these were not Christmas Carols. They were pagan songs, sung at the Winter Solstice celebrations as people danced round stone circles (The word carol originally meant to dance to something). The Winter Solstice is the shortest day of the year, usually taking place around the 22nd December. The word Carol actually means dance or a song of praise and joy! Carols used to be written and sung during all four seasons, but only the tradition of singing them at Christmas has really survived.

Early Christians took over the pagan solstice celebrations for Christmas and gave people Christian songs to sing instead of pagan ones. In 129, a Roman Bishop said that a song called “Angel’s Hymn” should be sung at a Christmas service in Rome. Another famous early Christmas Hymn was written in 760, by Comas of Jerusalem, for the Greek Orthodox Church. Soon after this many composers all over Europe started to write ‘Christmas carols’. However, not many people liked them as they were all written and sung in Latin, a language that the normal people couldn’t understand. By the time of the Middles Ages (the 1200s), most people had lost interest in celebrating Christmas altogether.

This was changed by St. Francis of Assisi when, in 1223, he started his Nativity Plays in Italy. The people in the plays sang songs or ‘canticles’ that told the story during the plays. Sometimes, the choruses of these new carols were in Latin; but normally they were all in a language that the people watching the play could understand and join in! The new carols spread to France, Spain, Germany and other European countries.

The earliest carol, like this, was written in 1410. Sadly only a very small fragment of it still exists. The carol was about Mary and Jesus meeting different people in Bethlehem. Most Carols from this time and the Elizabethan period are untrue stories, very loosely based on the Christmas story, about the holy family and were seen as entertaining rather than religious songs. They were usually sung in homes rather than in churches! Traveling singers or Minstrels started singing these carols and the words were changed for the local people wherever they were traveling. One carols that changed like this is ‘I Saw Three Ships’.

Etching of old Caroling Singing Men from: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Koledniki-valvasor.jpg

When Oliver Cromwell and the Puritans came to power in England in 1647, the celebration of Christmas and singing carols was stopped. However, the carols survived as people still sang them in secret. Carols remained mainly unsung until Victorian times, when two men called William Sandys and Davis Gilbert collected lots of old Christmas music from villages in England.

Before carol singing in public became popular, there were sometimes official carol singers called ‘Waits’. These were bands of people led by important local leaders (such as council leaders) who had the only power in the towns and villages to take money from the public (if others did this, they were sometimes charged as beggars!). They were called ‘Waits’ because they only sang on Christmas Eve (This was sometimes known as ‘watchnight’ or ‘waitnight’ because of the shepherds were watching their sheep when the angels appeared to them.), when the Christmas celebrations began.

Also, at this time, many orchestras and choirs were being set up in the cities of England and people wanted Christmas songs to sing, so carols once again became popular. Many new carols, such as ‘Good King Wenceslas’, were also written in the Victorian period.

New carols services were created and became popular, as did the custom of singing carols in the streets. Both of these customs are still popular today! One of the most popular types of Carols services are Carols by Candlelight services. At this service, the church is only lit by candlelight and it feels very Christmassy! Carols by Candlelight services are held in countries all over the world.

The most famous type of Carol Service might be a Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols, where carols and Bible readings tell the Christmas Story.

This year for Christmas I wanted to do something totally different. I wanted to include all of my friends, followers and family, from around the world in celebration of Christmas by wishing everyone a Merry Christmas in their native language.

Some languages below use different characters and alphabets, so I have also spelt them in English as best I can.

MERRY CHRISTMAS EVERYONE

African Languages

Afrikaans (South Africa, Namibia)

Geseënde Kersfees
Akan (Ghana, Ivory Coast, Benin) Afishapa
Amharic (Ethiopia) Melikam Gena! (መልካም ገና!)
Chewa (Zambia, Malawi, Mozambique, Zimbabwe) Moni Wa Chikondwelero Cha Kristmasi
Dagbani (Ghana) Ni ti Burunya Chou
Edo (Nigeria) Iselogbe
Fula/Fulani (Niger, Nigeria, Benin, Cameroon, Chad, Sudan, Togo, Guinea, Sierra Leone) Jabbama be salla Kirismati
Hausa (Niger, Nigeria, Ghana, Benin, Cameroon, Ivory Coast, Togo) barka dà Kirsìmatì
Ibibio (Nigeria) Idara ukapade isua
Igbo/Igo (Nigeria, Equatorial Guinea) E keresimesi Oma
Kinyarwanda (Rwanda, Uganda, DR Congo) Noheli nziza
Lingala (DR Congo, Rep Congo, Central African Republic, Angola) Mbotama Malamu
Luganda (Uganda) Seku Kulu
Ndebele (Zimbabwe, South Africa) Izilokotho Ezihle Zamaholdeni
Shona (Zimbabwe, Mozambique, Botswana) Muve neKisimusi
Soga/Lasoga (Uganda) Mwisuka Sekukulu
Somali (Somalia, Djibouti) Kirismas Wacan
Sotho (Lesotho, South Africa) Le be le keresemese e monate
Swahili (Tanzania, Kenya, DR Congo, Uganda) Krismasi Njema / Heri ya Krismasi
Tigrinya (Ethiopia and Eritreia) Ruhus Beal Lidet
Xhosa/isiXhosa (South Africa, Zimbabwe, Lesotho) Krismesi emnandi
Yoruba (Nigeria, Benin) E ku odun, e ku iye’dun
Zulu (South Africa, Zimbabwe, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland) UKhisimusi omuhle
Afganistan (Dari) Christmas Mubarak (کرسمس مبارک)
Albanian Gëzuar Krishtlindjen
Arabic Eid Milad Majid (عيد ميلاد مجيد)
Which means ‘Glorious Birth Feast’
Armenian Shnorhavor Amanor yev Surb Tznund (Շնորհավոր Ամանոր և Սուրբ Ծնունդ)
Which means ‘Congratulations for the Holy Birth’
Belgium

Dutch/Flemish

Vrolijk Kerstfeest
French Joyeux Noël
German Frohe Weihnachten
Walloon djoyeus Noyé
Alsatian E güeti Wïnâchte
Bulgarian Vesela Koleda
China

Mandarin

Sheng Dan Kuai Le (圣诞快乐)
Cantonese Seng Dan Fai Lok (聖誕快樂)
Cornish Nadelik Lowen
Croatian (and Bosnian) Sretan Božić
Czech Veselé Vánoce
Danish Glædelig Jul
Esperanto Feliĉan Kristnaskon
Estonian Rõõmsaid Jõulupühi
Finnish Hyvää joulua
France

French

Joyeux Noël
Breton Nedeleg Laouen
Corsican Bon Natale
German Frohe Weihnachten
Greek Kala Christouyenna or Καλά Χριστούγεννα
Georgian gilocav shoba-akhal c’els
or გილოცავ შობა-ახალ წელს
Greenland

Greenlandic

Juullimi Pilluarit
Danish (also used in Greenland) Glædelig Jul
Hawaiian Mele Kalikimaka
Holland (Dutch) Zalig Kerstfeest or Zalig Kerstmis (both mean Merry Christmas), Vrolijk Kerstfeest (Cheerful Christmas) or Prettig Kerstfeest (Nice Christmas)
Hungarian Boldog karácsonyt (Happy Christmas) or Kellemes karácsonyi ünnepeket (pleasant Christmas holidays)
Icelandic Gleðileg jól
India

Bengali (also spoken in Bangladesh)

shubho bôṛodin (শুভ বড়দিন)
Gujarati Anandi Natal or Khushi Natal (આનંદી નાતાલ)
Hindi Śubh krisamas (शुभ क्रिसमस)
Kannada kris mas habbada shubhaashayagalu (ಕ್ರಿಸ್ ಮಸ್ ಹಬ್ಬದ ಶುಭಾಷಯಗಳು)
Konkani Khushal Borit Natala
Malayalam Christmas inte mangalaashamsakal
Marathi Śubh Nātāḷ (शुभ नाताळ) or Natal Chya shubhechha
Mizo Krismas Chibai
Punjabi karisama te nawāṃ sāla khušayāṃwālā hewe (ਕਰਿਸਮ ਤੇ ਨਵਾੰ ਸਾਲ ਖੁਸ਼ਿਯਾੰਵਾਲਾ ਹੋਵੇ)
Sanskrit Krismasasya shubhkaamnaa
Shindi Christmas jun wadhayun
Tamil kiṟistumas vāḻttukkaḷ (கிறிஸ்துமஸ் வாழ்த்துக்கள்)
Telugu Christmas Subhakankshalu
Urdu krismas mubarak (کرسمس)
Indonesian Selamat Natal
Iran

Farsi

Christmas MobArak
Kurdish (Kumanji) Kirîsmes u ser sala we pîroz be
Irish – Gaelic Nollaig Shona Dhuit
Israel – Hebrew Chag Molad Sameach (חג מולד שמח)
meaning Happy festival of the Birth
Italy

Italian

Buon Natale
Sicilian Bon Natali
Ladin Bon/Bun Nadèl
Japanese Meri Kurisumasu (or ‘Meri Kuri’ for short!)

Hiragana: めりーくりすます

Katakana: メリークリスマス

Korean ‘Meri krismas’ (메리 크리스마스) or ‘Jeulgaeun krismas doeseyo’ (즐거운 크리스마스 되세요)
Latin Felicem Diem Nativitatis (Merry Day of the Nativity)
Latvian Priecïgus Ziemassvºtkus
Lithuanian Linksmų Kalėdų
Macedonian Streken Bozhik or Среќен Божик
Madagascar (Malagasy) Tratra ny Noely
Maltese Il-Milied it-Tajjeb
Malaysia

Bahasa/Malay

Selamat Hari Natal
Malayalam Puthuvalsara Aashamsakal
Manx (spoken on the Isle of Man) Nollick Ghennal
Mexico (Nahuatl) Cualli netlācatilizpan
Montenegrin Hristos se rodi (Христос се роди) – Christ is born
Vaistinu se rodi (Ваистину се роди) – truly born (reply)
Native American / First Nation Languages
Apache (Western) Gozhqq Keshmish
Cherokee Danistayohihv &Aliheli’sdi Itse Udetiyvasadisv
Inuit Quvianagli Anaiyyuniqpaliqsi
Navajo Nizhonigo Keshmish
Yupik Alussistuakeggtaarmek
This page has a large list of Merry Christmas Native/First Nation Languages
Nepali Kreesmasko shubhkaamnaa (क्रस्मसको शुभकामना)
New Zealand (Maori) Meri Kirihimete
Norwegian God Jul or Gledelig Jul
Philippines

Tagalog

Maligayang Pasko
Ilokano Naragsak Nga Paskua
Ilonggo Malipayon nga Pascua
Sugbuhanon or Cebuano Maayong Pasko
Bicolano Maugmang Pasko
Pangalatok or Pangasinense Maabig ya pasko or Magayagan inkianac
Warey Warey Maupay Nga Pasko
Papiamentu – spoken in the Lesser Antilles (Aruba, Curaçao, and Bonaire) Bon Pascu
Polish Wesołych Świąt
Portuguese Feliz Natal or Boas Festas (Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year)
Romanian Crăciun Fericit
Russian s rah-zh-dee-st-VOHM (C рождеством!) or
s-schah-st-lee-vah-vah rah-zh dee-st-vah (Счастливого рождества!)
Samoan Manuia Le Kerisimasi
Scotland

Scots

Blithe Yule
Gaelic Nollaig Chridheil
Serbian Hristos se rodi (Христос се роди) – Christ is born
Vaistinu se rodi (Ваистину се роди) – truly born (reply)
Slovakian Veselé Vianoce
Slovene or Slovenian Vesel Božič
Somali Kirismas Wacan
Spain

Spanish (Españo)

Feliz Navidad or Nochebuena (which means ‘Holy Night’ – Christmas Eve)
Catalan Bon Nadal
Galician Bo Nadal
Basque (Euskara) Eguberri on (which means ‘Happy New Day’)
Sranantongo (spoken in Suriname) Swit’ Kresneti
Sinhala (spoken in Sri Lanka) Suba Naththalak Wewa (සුබ නත්තලක් වේවා)
Swedish God Jul
Swiss Schöni Wiehnachte
Thai Suk sarn warn Christmas
Turkish Mutlu Noeller
Ukranian ‘Веселого Різдва’ Veseloho Rizdva (Merry Christmas) or ‘Христос Рождається’ Khrystos Rozhdayetsia (Christ is Born)
Vietnamese Chuć Mưǹg Giańg Sinh
Welsh Nadolig Llawen
Sci-fi & Fantasy Languages!

Klingon (Star Trek)

toDwI’ma’ qoS yItIvqu’ (Our Savior’s birthday you-enjoy!)
Quenya (Lord of the Rings) Alassë a Hristomerendë (Joyous Feast of Christ)
Sindarin (Lord of the Rings) Mereth Veren e-Doled Eruion (Joyous Feast of the Coming of the Son of God)

According to the Bible, authority ought to be submitted to and respected. This is a hard teaching for many, as the Bible would seem to indemnify those who rule or preside over others in a cruel and unjust manner. Perhaps the most widely-quoted and well-known verse regarding this matter comes from Romans 13. God advises us to submit to “governing authorities, for there is no authority except that which God has established” (Romans 13:1). We are further advised in the Bible that rebelling against authority is rebelling against God (Romans 13:2).

Many would argue that such passages deal only with benevolent rulers because the Scripture continues to say that these rulers “hold no terror for those who do right” and that they are “God’s servant, an agent of wrath to bring punishment on the wrongdoer”. This is why “it is necessary to submit” and “why you pay taxes, for the authorities are God’s servants, who give their full time to governing” (Romans 13:3-6).

What does God say about reacting to unjust rulers? In another well-known and challenging passage, the Bible says: “Slaves, submit yourselves to your master with all respect, not only to those who are good and considerate, but also to those who are harsh.” He explains further: “For it is God’s will that by doing good you should silence the ignorant talk of foolish men” and “Show proper respect to everyone: Love the brotherhood of believers, fear God, honor the king. For it is commendable if a man bears up under the pain of unjust suffering because he is conscious of God, [and] if you suffer for doing good and you endure it, this is commendable before God. To this you were called, because Christ suffered for you, leaving you an example, that you should follow in his steps” (1 Peter 2:15, 17-21).

These are very difficult messages and may incline some to feel God has a sadistic streak. This would be a misreading of the Bible. God’s call always to show love, honor, and respect to others represents how He envisions His Kingdom on earth. He wishes us to live life to the fullest (John 10:10) and promises us a glorious and eternal life (John 3:16; 14:2-3, 23).

Ephesians 6:6-9 exhorts us to obey not merely to win favor just when people’s eyes are on us, but to act as “slaves of Christ, doing the will of God from your heart,” serving wholeheartedly as if serving the Lord and knowing that He will reward us for whatever good we do. His message is consistent for slave masters, enjoining them to “treat your slaves in the same way” because He is master of both them, and their slaves.

Despite instances of poor or tyrannical government, of which many examples are provided in the books of Judges, 1 Kings, and 2 Kings (as well as in today’s world), God assures us that on balance, respect, kindness, and submission are part of His plan (1 Thessalonians 5:12-18) and failure to follow this prescription results in our devolving into depravity and anarchy because of self-centeredness (2 Timothy 3:1-9).

In short, God assures believers that temporary troubles never should trump the exhilarating ecstasy that awaits us with Him.

Is abortion murder?

The subject of abortion is perhaps one of the most highly charged issues of our day. Finding an honest answer to the question “is abortion murder?” takes courage for those who have performed abortions or have had abortions themselves. The Bible is clear about the fact that murder is wrong (Exodus 20:13). However, in some cases, the Bible does not forbid killing. Soldiers representing their country were expected to kill soldiers on the opposing side (Joshua 11:20). That is not murder. Animals were killed for food and for sacrifice (Exodus 24:5; Genesis 9:3–4). That is not murder either.

Murder is defined as “the unlawful, premeditated killing of one human being by another.” Murder is unlawful killing—that is, killing that is done by the judgment of one human being against another, for personal (rather than national) reasons. The Bible condemns murder repeatedly as a characteristic of a wicked society (Deuteronomy 5:17; Isaiah 1:21; Hosea 4:2; Matthew 5:21). Determining whether or not abortion is murder involves two considerations: first, whether or not a fetus in utero is actually a human being, and, second, if a fetus is a child, whether or not abortion can be rightly called murder since it is legal in most countries. If murder is unlawful killing, it would follow that a lawful killing would not be murder.

One reason murder is outlawed is that it is unethical for one person to unilaterally decide the fate of another. Under the Old Testament Law, a murderer was not put to death unless there were multiple witnesses: “No person shall be put to death on the testimony of one witness” (Numbers 35:30). In war, soldiers do not decide to kill for their own purposes, but they kill out of obedience to a national interest—if they fight for an honorable nation, the national interest will be to protect innocent civilians from some threat. Abortion is different. Abortion is killing based on a mother’s unilateral judgment and choice, which defines it as murder. But if the fetus is not yet human—if the fetus is just a mass of impersonal tissue or an animal—ending its life would not be considered murder.

So, is a fetus a human? Or is it something else? Biologically speaking, human life begins at conception. When the mother’s egg and the father’s sperm come together, they combine and create a new string of DNA that is personalized and totally unique. DNA is coded information, the blueprint for the new human’s growth and development. No more genetic material needs to be added; the zygote in the womb is as human as the mother in whose womb it dwells. The difference between a fetus and any one of us is one of age, location, and level of dependence. When a mother aborts the process of fetal development, she is destroying a unique life.

The Bible clearly points to conception as the beginning of human life. Samson said, “I have been a Nazirite to God from my mother’s womb” (Judges 16:17). He refers to his unborn self as having already been what God planned him to be—a Nazirite. David says, “You formed my inward parts; you knitted me together in my mother’s womb” (Psalm 139:13). Again, we see David referring to himself as a person in the womb. Then, he says, “Your eyes saw my unformed substance; in your book were written, every one of them, the days that were formed for me, when as yet there was none of them” (Psalm 139:16). David is saying that God had all of his days planned out for him while he was still in the womb. Again, this evidence points to personhood beginning at conception, rather than at the moment of birth. We see God had a similar plan for the life of the pre-born Jeremiah: “Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, before you were born I set you apart; I appointed you as a prophet to the nations” (Jeremiah 1:5).

The Bible considers a fetus to be an unborn child, a planned human being that God is forming from the moment of conception. This being the case, it doesn’t really matter what human jurisprudence says or how socially or politically acceptable abortion is. God’s law takes precedence. A mother who decides to abort her child is unilaterally making a decision to end another person’s life—and that is and always has been the definition of murder.

  Abortion healing and recovery is possible. Having an abortion and regretting it later is a common experience felt by women. While what has been done cannot be undone, you can experience healing and recovery after an abortion. The God of all comfort and healing is more than able to ease the sorrow and pain of an abortion and can restore you to life and joy.

An unwanted pregnancy can be a frightening experience for someone who is not financially, emotionally, or physically prepared for such a responsibility. Perhaps you are one of the many women and teenage girls who are scared, confused, and desperate. In your search for answers, perhaps you were fooled into believing that your unborn child was an expendable “lump of tissue,” not really a pre-born human being. Often the realization of the truth comes later, in the form of post-abortion stress syndrome, guilt, and depression. This is where abortion healing and recovery is essential.

There is good news for anyone who has had an abortion, and that is that God offers forgiveness to anyone who asks for it. Romans 3:22 says, “We are made right in God’s sight when we trust in Jesus Christ to take away our sins. And we all can be saved in this same way, no matter who we are or what we have done.” It is never too late to come to God for healing. There is nothing we can do that is so bad it is unforgivable. God offers this forgiveness, and He also offers peace of mind and heart, if we will only receive it by putting our faith in Jesus, allowing Him permanent residence and authority in our lives.

Perhaps you are already a Christian, yet you decided to have an abortion, perhaps out of fear of how you would be perceived by the Christian community. Even if you understood how God feels about abortion, you may have felt, out of desperation, that you must get rid of the “evidence.” This is perhaps, in part, the responsibility of the church, which often does not support women in this situation as well as we should. Please understand that God is ready to offer forgiveness, redemption, and healing. Yes, having an abortion was wrong, it was the taking of a life, but it is not unforgivable. The Bible says that there is no condemnation for those who belong to Christ Jesus (Romans 8:1), and so when we ask Him for forgiveness, He freely gives it. This is not because we deserve it, but because this is the loving nature of our Lord.

When you realize the repercussions of having an abortion, you may find it difficult to forgive yourself. But God does not want us to live with perpetual guilt; He wants us to learn from our mistakes and use them to His advantage, as well as our own. It will require a lot of prayer, which is simply conversation with God. This and studying the Bible help us get to know God better so that we can trust Him to heal us and be better equipped to do His work. Instead of dwelling on the act, be encouraged to use your experience to help others. You may first need to go through Christian counseling to help get through the experience, as it can be traumatic. But in the aftermath, if you trust in the Lord, you will be stronger and more spiritually mature. You can experience abortion healing and abortion recovery! You will have gone through an experience that God is able to use to strengthen your character and prepare you for ministering to others.

If you are looking for abortion healing or abortion recovery, please contact “If Not For Grace Ministries” (www.infg.org) for free resources and counseling.

The decision whether to have an abortion is painful, complicated, and difficult. If you are willing to listen, we’d like to present some reasons why you should not have an abortion. There are good reasons, spiritual, practical, emotional, and factual, why you should not have an abortion. If you are looking for help regarding abortion, please contact “If Not For Grace Ministries” (www.infg.org) for free resources and counseling.

An abortion is the deliberate termination of a human life while it is still in the womb. We know it is life because it grows and develops. We know it is human because basic biology teaches us that like produces like. God established this truth in the first chapter of Genesis when He commanded that all living things were to reproduce “after their kind” (Genesis 1:11, 24, 28). Since the parents are human beings, the unborn life within the mother is also a human being. So abortion is the intentional extermination of that unborn human being. That is one good reason to not have an abortion.

Every woman’s situation is different, and abortions are sought for many reasons. To arrive at a reasonable answer to why a woman should not have an abortion, she must ask herself the reverse of this question: Why should I have an abortion? Why should I terminate my child’s life while it is still in the womb? At this point, pro-choice advocates often create a smokescreen by introducing the issues of rape and incest. While both rape and incest are horrible crimes and should be punished by law, the fact remains that the percentage of women seeking abortions for either of these reasons is extremely small. And this smokescreen does not address the fact that, regardless of how or why a child was conceived, he or she is as fully human as any other child. The circumstances of conception have nothing to do with the viability of the infant. If abortion is the willful murder of an innocent, growing fetus, then it is still murder even if the child was conceived through violence or incestuous relations. Murder of the innocent does not erase the devastation caused by evil.

When we remove the smokescreen, the possible reasons for seeking abortion are down to two: personal preference or to save the life of the mother. Since even fewer cases exist where abortion is required to save the life of the mother, that argument gets far more press than it deserves. Modern medicine can do miraculous things in treating pregnant women without harming their babies, so this issue is nothing more than a red herring meant to distract from the real issue: personal preference. In recent years, the medical argument has been stretched to include the idea of “mental health of the mother,” which is a vague term that can include any feelings of fear or ambiguity the pregnancy may have evoked in a woman. This argument is merely an extension of the smokescreen and needs to be categorized as such. Some women are convinced that their lives and futures will be ruined to carry this child to term. However, crisis pregnancy centers partner with mothers throughout pregnancy and help them choose the best options for both mother and baby. These options can include aid if she keeps the baby or adoption assistance if she decides to go that route.

Due to rampant sexual immorality in our world, unplanned pregnancies abound. When modern culture decided to separate sexuality from morality, the problems got worse. God never intended any such separation. He created sex for the marriage relationship and for children to be welcomed into that marriage, regardless of whether or not they were a surprise to the parents (Genesis 1:23–24; Psalm 127:3). Scripture is clear that every human being has intrinsic value simply because every human being is a unique creation of God. There may be accidental parents, but there are no accidental children (Psalm 139).

A man and a woman can partner with God in the creation of a unique human being, but the man and woman are not the creators of that human being. As many infertile couples can attest, desire for children plus sexual activity does not necessarily produce a child. God says that life is in His hands. He takes strong issue with those who believe they have the right to murder innocent children. In fact, God brought harsh judgment upon nations who offered their babies to false gods (2 Chronicles 28:3; Jeremiah 19:5; Ezekiel 20:31). Why do we imagine He is not equally outraged when we offer our babies to our gods of culture, money, fame, or convenience?

So the final answer is that a woman should not have an abortion because it is the murder of an innocent human being. God’s command against murder precedes the Ten Commandments and the Law of Moses (Genesis 9:5–6). This was a universal decree for all humanity. God is the only Giver of life, and only He can dictate when that life should end. Murder is the most arrogant sin a human being can commit because it requires the murderer to usurp God’s right to determine the lifespan of another person. Murder sets a human being in the place of God. In Genesis 9:5 God says, “For your lifeblood I will surely demand an accounting. . . . From each human being . . . I will demand an accounting for the life of another human being.” Those who willingly participate in an abortion must answer to the Creator of that life.

However, abortion is not the unpardonable sin. When Jesus offered Himself on the cross in our place, abortion was among the sins He suffered for. He took murder, rape, incest, and abortion upon Himself and paid the price we owe God (2 Corinthians 5:21). When we come to Jesus in faith, confessing our sin and turning away from it, God offers a full pardon. He considers His Son’s death and resurrection as sufficient payment for violating His commands. But He also does not take that payment lightly. Forgiveness does not offer us an excuse to continue heaping sin upon His Son’s shoulders (Romans 6:1–6).

Even when the sin of abortion has been washed away by the blood of Jesus, the effects remain. Women who have had abortions often suffer years of shame and regret. Some have fertility problems later on, caused by violating their bodies in the unnatural act of tearing a growing fetus from its mother’s womb. Many women who have had abortions live every day with the knowledge of what they have done and are haunted by thoughts such as, “He would be six years old today,” or “She would have graduated high school this year.” Those who naturally miscarry have some of those same thoughts, but they come without the guilt and regret abortion brings.

Abortion can seem like a quick and easy solution to the problem of an unplanned pregnancy. But sin is never the best way. Never. Sin has eternal repercussions that it never advertises up front. Sin costs more than we want to pay and hurts more than we thought it would. You should not have an abortion because you and your baby deserve better than that. Seek God’s answers instead.